Mining Hall inductee's family was influential
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Nov 21, 2013  |  Vote 0    0

Mining Hall inductee's family was influential

St. Marys Journal Argus

Recently, the Journal Argus published a story about Kathleen Rice (1883-1963) and her upcoming induction into the Canadian Mining Hall of Fame. It is wonderful that this pioneering woman has received recognition half a century after her death for her contributions to this industry. (For more information, visit the website www.mininghalloffame.ca or that of the nominator: Women in Mining: www.wim-manitoba.ca.) St. Marys residents celebrate this event, pleased that the story, well-known locally to many, is getting wider recognition. The prominent local family that encompassed and influenced Kathleen as she grew up also deserves attention.

Kathleen Creighton Starr Rice was the daughter of Henry Lincoln Rice (1857-1933) and Charlotte Carter (1862-1941) who were married in 1880. H.L. Rice’s father was the Reverend Dr. Samuel Dwight Rice (1815-1884), a distinguished Methodist minister, church administrator and educator who served in St. Marys during the building of a new Methodist Church in 1879 (today’s United Church). His wife was Fanny Lavinia (Starr) Rice, originally from Nova Scotia.

Charlotte’s father, George Carter, was a staunch Methodist, an ambitious grain merchant and subsequently owner of the G. Carter Milling Company, the largest milling operation in this area. His residence (224 Jones Street East) reflected his prosperity. He brought his son and two sons-in-law, including H.L. Rice, into the family business. Charlotte’s mother, Elizabeth Creighton Carter, supported her husband’s wish to keep their family nearby. Charlotte was very attached to her mother; they became especially close after George’s death in 1889.

Henry and Charlotte Rice began married life in a large new house (236 Jones Street East) next door to the Carters. But when George died, this house was sold and the Rices, including little Kathleen, moved in with Elizabeth. Kathleen had cousins across the street at 217 Jones Street and just around the corner at 67 Peel Street – a tight family network. This week’s photograph shows Kathleen, about 16 years old, with her parents and her younger brother, G.D. Lincoln Rice, born in 1893. Kathleen strongly resembles her father.

The images reproduced in the Journal Argus on Nov. 6 were incorrectly credited to the Canadian Mining Hall of Fame. In fact, they are from the St. Marys Museum, part of a large collection of Carter and Rice material. Much of it was placed there by Larry Pfaff who has studied and written about these families for years. Other items were donated by members of the Rice family. The story of Kathleen’s years in St. Marys will continue next week.

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