Eat at our House - June 4, 2008
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Jun 04, 2008  |  Vote 0    0

Eat at our House - June 4, 2008

St. Marys Journal Argus

The arrival of the month of June starts many thinking of making holiday plans. As always, we are cautioned before we leave to protect the home and its contents we leave behind. Some of the ways you do this is by cancelling your newspaper, and mail (or having someone look after picking it up), and having a relative or neighbour pick up flyers and check through your house once or twice to make sure there are no leaky taps, etc.It might be an insurance "grab" but it still makes sense to me that if you are going out of country, check on your home and personal insurance. As far as travel medical insurance, we were always advised to add a couple of days onto your return date. It certainly covered us one time when coming home from our Panama Canal trip. Our ship landed in Acapulco, Mexico from where we were to fly directly home but there was a strike on and we were delayed a full day; it would have meant we would have been without medical insurance for that day. As they warn, if you land in the hospital in the States or another country it could mean losing your home to pay the bills.Also, they are now telling us that we should double-check our home and contents with our insurance agent (in my case it was my lawyer) who pointed out I wasn't fully covered. The value of your contents is often part of your house insurance and could mean you are not insured for replacement value, which could include jewellery, paintings, and furnishing. And some insurance policies do not include flooding, fire, or natural disasters. I've been told that many now use videotaping and verbally record everything they see as they walk through their homes, and put this in a safety deposit box or leave it with a lawyer. The week wasn't all doom and gloom however; I finally had the fun of cleaning out the small chest freezer that I keep in the garage. I'm ashamed to say that I don't think it has been cleaned out for three years. Needless to say, some small containers had fallen to the bottom and by the time I rescued them were completely non-recognizable and ended up in the garbage. It is done now and as I always do, I promised myself that from now on, everything will be labelled with contents and date. Date is most important. It is a mystery to me why I don't follow this rule. But it's not as bad as it sounds ' I usually keep a watch over what goes in the freezer.    All is well that ends well? I found some ground beef that still looked healthy and made a big pot of my favourite- as well as my family's - spaghetti sauce. The recipe was given to me years ago when I first started writing this column and I have never found a better one. And this will go into the infamous freezer as I am expecting visitors, mainly family, and what is more easy then warming up this sauce with noodles, making a one-dish meal. Green salad and garlic bread are great additions. Italian Spaghetti Sauce1 can mushroom soup, undiluted2 tablespoon bacon fat (optional)1/2 cup olive oil (this is what the original recipe called for in original recipe but I've never used that much, maybe half2 pounds ground beef1 cup chopped onion1 can diced tomatoes 4 sprigs of fresh parsley, (if using dried, 1 tsp.)2 cloves garlic minced1 tbsp. sage, powdered1 tsp. thyme, powderedChopped green pepper, and chopped celery. Simmer onions in oil and fat until golden. Chopped mushrooms can be added here if you wish. Add meat, stir and break up until fine, then fry until golden brown. Add soup, tomatoes, seasonings and simmer for at least 2 hours. One-half to 1 cup red wine also can be added. Serve over hot cooked spaghetti or other pasta and top with Parmesan cheese.And wonderful, wonderful rhubarb, a sure sign of spring, is here! Centuries ago the Chinese would prescribe it as a natural remedy for digestive problems. It wasn't until Ben Franklin introduced the seeds to North America that it became the delicious dessert that it is today.Stewed Rhubarb3 cups chopped rhubarb, cut in 1-inch pieces.1 cup granulated sugar2 tbsp.2 tsp. minced candied ginger, optionalPlace the rhubarb, sugar water, and ginger if using, in a medium saucepan over medium low heat. Bring to boil and reduce heat to simmer, simmer for about 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and serve warm or cold or store in fridge covered up to three days.The debate over whether rhubarb is a fruit or vegetable doesn't matter' rhubarb always means pie!Classic Rhubarb PieUncooked pastry for two-crust pie (buy it ready-made if you are against making it from scratch)4 cups rhubarb cut into one-inch pieces4 tbsp. flour1 1/2 cups sugarButterCombine rhubarb with flour and sugar and let stand 15 minutes. Turn into unbaked pie shell, dot with butter and cover with top crust. Bake at 425 degrees for 10 minutes, then turn oven temperature down to 350 degrees. Bake 45 to 50 minutes, or until browned and fruit is tender when pricked with fork. Serve hot or cold with ice cream if desired.  

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